Georgia Season #2

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STEROIDCHICKEN
Posts: 2849
Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2012 3:13 pm
I mostly hunt turkey in: GEORGIA
While hunting I carry: MY MOSSY OAK WRAPPED CAMERA AND TRIPOD, GUN OR BOW, VEST....AND HOPEFULLY, SOME LUCK.
Location: MCDONOUGH,GA
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Georgia Season #2

Post by STEROIDCHICKEN » Tue May 16, 2017 10:26 am

The season has been tough ever since the first harvest. The gobblers seem to gobble on the roost several times but once their feet hit the ground, they go silent. I have had several encounters within the past couple of weekends where I have had a tom within shooting distance but just couldn’t close the deal, mostly because of obstacles in the way or the bird coming in on my opposite shooting side. I will say that it has been some terrific hunts and I am thankful for them. A bird doesn’t have to be thrown over the shoulder to have a great hunt, that’s just the bonus of the hunt.
So here we go again. This morning I woke up early and decided to go back after a bird that I had gotten on earlier in the season. I had him at twelve feet just spitting and drumming but unfortunately, he was on my right side and with me being right handed, it just wasn’t going to happen that day so I let him ease off without spooking him for future hunts. I knew where the bird roosted and where he liked to visit after fly down so I decided to set up in his strut zone. I got situated as the morning started to wake up. The sun was starting to show its light and the song birds and owls where doing their morning ritual of sounding off in the foggy, yet dim sky. The woods were silent when it came to gobbling toms, not one gobble close, nor far away that I could hear. I sat there for a while thinking that he may still show up and come in silent, nada. I did manage to call in a hen that was very vocal but she came in alone and was looking for the hen that she had heard earlier. She slipped on by and I sat there for another thirty minutes before deciding to get up and go to another area. By this time, the sun was high and it was hot. I went to the area where I had taken my first gobbler of the year from and found me a shady spot to nestle in to. I hadn’t been there 10 minutes when I felt something trying to pinch me on my arm. I looked down and somehow, a five foot long King snake had crawled up into my lap and was trying to bite me on the forearm. How in the heck did that happen without me even knowing that he was in my lap and over the top of my arm. I wasn’t asleep or nodding off, maybe I was just focused, who knows. Anyways, you can imagine what happened next, especially after the rattlesnake instance I encountered last spring. Not having the patience or nerve to resist moving like I did with the rattlesnake, I jumped up and tried to hurdle the log that was positioned out in front of me but with the wet soil, I slipped and went straight down into the mud bruising both knees and nearly slamming my face against the ground. I freaked out….I don’t need any more encounters with snakes. I’ve had a belly full already. I was done for the morning hunt after that incident so I headed back to camp to rejuvenate and get my nerves settled down some.
Around three o’clock, I decided to head back out for an afternoon hunt. It has ninety plus degrees but I was going to give it a shot anyways. This hunt was going to be more of a scouting hunt versus just a regular sit and wait kind of hunt. Usually, the afternoon hunts for me consist of going to a food plot or getting close to a roosting area and sit and call sparingly beings the birds aren’t too vocal in the evenings at this point of the season to run and gun. We had just had a good rain the day before so with some boot time, I would be able to see the fresh sign in the roads and get a good idea if the birds were using the area. I had three spots in mind to check this afternoon with the first one consisting of mature pines that had some undergrowth and hardwood bottoms throughout. I arrived at my first spot, slipped on my gear and was wondering to myself, why and the heck am I out here in this miserable heat, but to kill a bird, you have to be in the woods. I started slipping slowly down the road which led into a nice shady oak bottom and then the road proceeded back up into a large food plot. As I neared the top, maybe twenty yards from the plot, I thought I saw a hen feeding from right to left through the tall grass so instead of busting out any birds that may be up there, I decided to ease up an embankment on the left side of the road and just make a call to see if I could get a response. I didn’t want to take a chance and bust any turkeys out of the plot if they were already out there feeding. I quietly laid my chair down, crept up the side of the bank next to a tree that had some good cover around it and got settled. I gave a soft yelp and was cut off by a thunderous gobble. The bird was up in the plot and to the left maybe fifty yards from me but I couldn’t see him from the vegetation that surrounded the plot. I got my gun up and safety off and began to scratch the leaves giving him the illusion that a hen was feeding just around the edge of the plot. It didn’t take but a few minutes and as I was straining my eyes trying to catch a glimpse of him, there he was, coming around the edge in full strut. Maybe thirty yards away, he stretched his head up to find the hen that he had just heard and I let him have it. BOOM! My second bird of the season was down. It was a quick, but effective hunt to say the least but sometimes, that it how it works. A hunter can go for days trying to get a bird to act right and sometimes the hunt goes just as planned and works out to your advantage. Had I not been cautious as I approached the food plot, this hunt would have never played out like it did, and for that, I am grateful.
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Denny
Posts: 1340
Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2012 9:23 pm
I mostly hunt turkey in: Georgia
While hunting I carry: Remington 870 SPST 12 guage, my Mossy Oak cushion and a field bag full of goodies.

Re: Georgia Season #2

Post by Denny » Tue May 16, 2017 5:41 pm

What is it that causes you to attract snakes! :o Yikes!
Another good bird Roger. Congrats!

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Cut N Run
Posts: 1615
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 8:21 am
I mostly hunt turkey in: North Carolina
While hunting I carry: Benelli SBE II, Burris Speed Bead, SumToy .650, and a lighter zipped up in a vest pocket
Location: Central North Carolina

Re: Georgia Season #2

Post by Cut N Run » Fri May 19, 2017 10:28 pm

Right On, Roger.
How long is the beard on that dude? It looks thick.

Jim
Luck Counts, good or bad.

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STEROIDCHICKEN
Posts: 2849
Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2012 3:13 pm
I mostly hunt turkey in: GEORGIA
While hunting I carry: MY MOSSY OAK WRAPPED CAMERA AND TRIPOD, GUN OR BOW, VEST....AND HOPEFULLY, SOME LUCK.
Location: MCDONOUGH,GA
Contact:

Re: Georgia Season #2

Post by STEROIDCHICKEN » Sun May 21, 2017 7:48 am

I didn't measure any of my beards this year nor spurs Jim. I would guess that it was around 9-1/2" to 10" though.


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gaswamp
Posts: 159
Joined: Tue Apr 02, 2013 7:46 pm
I mostly hunt turkey in: Georgia
While hunting I carry: as little as possible

Re: Georgia Season #2

Post by gaswamp » Mon May 22, 2017 2:55 pm

my kind of hunt

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sman
Posts: 4757
Joined: Sun Jan 29, 2012 10:31 am
I mostly hunt turkey in: Georgia
While hunting I carry: Slates, strikers, mouth calls, and a thermocell!!!!!!

Re: Georgia Season #2

Post by sman » Tue May 23, 2017 9:53 pm

That's awesome! Always side with caution when it comes to turkeys.

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